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Aquarius Subligar

Statistics

Aquarius Subligar RareExclusive
[Legs] All Races
DEF: 23 VIT +1
Lv. 50 MNK

Other Uses

Used in Quests: Brygid the Stylist Returns

NPC Sell Price: ~700 gil

Synthesis Recipes

None

Used in Recipes

  • None

Desynthesis Recipe

None

Obtained From Desynthesis

  • None

How to Obtain

Cannot be auctioned, traded, or bazaared, but can be delivered to a character on the same account.

Dropped From

Name Level Zone
Fomor Monk 41-48 Phomiuna Aqueducts
54-58 Sacrarium

Historical Background

Aquarius is traditionally the eleventh constellation out of 12 in the Zodiac. It represents a figure holding a giant urn of water and pouring it out and is one of the oldest recognized constellations (not as old as Taurus though). It is an Air-element sign and a Fixed sign (signs considered to have determination and stubborn refusal to change their position/view). Aquarius governs the 11th House (rules friends, groups, social concerns, hopes and dreams, as well as attitudes towards humanity as a whole) and is ruled by the celestial body Uranus (It was considered to be ruled by Saturn prior to Uranus' discovery in 1781). Aquarius is a constellation bounded by Capricornus, Pisces, Cetus, Pegasus, Delphinus, Aquila, Piscis Austrinus, Sculptor, Equuleus. Its named stars are (Alpha to Epsilon): Sadalmelik, Sadalsuud, Sadachbia, Skat, Albali. The constellation is located in a part of the night sky called The Sea (an area filled with several aquatic-themed constellations). Traditionally, people born from January 20 to February 18 are considered Aquarius. Aquarius is Latin for "Water-Bearer".


In Greek mythology, the constellation Aquarius memorializes the cupbearer of the gods, Ganymede, a teenage boy who Zeus fell in love with and carried off to Olympus to serve the gods drinks. In other cultures, this was considered some celestial figure pouring out floodwaters which submerged the earth in the Great Flood (the constellation Eridanus is often considered the river coming from this pot). That archetype of the Water-Bearer is far older than the Greeks' cupbearer.

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